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Leadership Ludwig Boltzmann Symposia R&D science technology University

Tokyo Institute of Technology President Yoshinao Mishima: “Become a world class University with more diversity by 2030”

Tokyo Institute of Technology President Yoshinao Mishima: Educational reforms at Tokyo Institute of Technology

(President of Tokyo Institute of Technology. Materials scientist specialized on nano-materials and high-performance materials)

Keynote presented at the 6th Ludwig Boltzmann Symposium on February 20, 2014 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo.

Tokyo Institute of Technology – short history

  • 1881: founded as The Tokyo Technical School
  • 1929: elevated to a degree-conferring university as Tokyo Kogyo Daigaku (Tokyo Institute of Technology)
  • 2004: reorganized as an independent administrative institution “National University Corporation Tokyo Institute of Technology”

Tokyo Institute of Technology – Statistics as of May 1, 2013

  • Undergraduate students: 4,790 (of which 180 are foreign students)
  • Graduate students: 3,611 Masters students + 1,512 Doctorate students = 5,123 (of which 943 (18.4%) are foreign students)
  • Research students: 90
  • Academic staff: 1,148
  • Administrative staff: 472

Tokyo Institute of Technology – The mission is to develop a new and vibrant society

  • produce graduates with a broad understanding of science and technology with both the ability and the determination to take on leading roles in society
  • create and support innovative science and technology that will lead to sustainable social development

Tokyo Institute of Technology – Detailed mission statements cover three areas

  • education: produce masters graduates who will thrive globally, and doctorate graduates who will come world’s top researchers are leaders
  • contributions to society and international activities
  • research: produce globally recognized results. Reform the research and support systems, in particular multi-step support for young researchers.

Tokyo Institute of Technology aims to become a world class university with greater diversity in faculty and students by 2030

Major educational reform plan (2013-…)

  1. Reborn masters and doctoral courses
  2. Reorganize departments, curriculum, courses
  3. Change from year-based study to credit based study
  4. Increase teaching in English, and numbers of foreign students
  5. Align with world top class universities for student transfers and credit transfers
  6. Enhance professional practice education for industry

A key challenge is that students primarily focus on earning credits to graduate, and lack a sense of mission to develop professional skills or to cooperate in our diverse global society. We need to change this type of behavior to create scientific leaders for the global arena.

We want to create a more flexible curriculum, that can be completed in a shorter time, so that students have more time for personal professional development and international exchange activities and communication skills.

Tokyo Institute of Technology: The Board of Directors decided on three pillars for education reform on September 6, 2013

  1. Build education system to become one of the world’s top universities
  2. Innovate learning
  3. Promote ambitious internationalization

We will move to a new and more flexible curriculum system, where undergraduate schools and graduate schools are blended.

Tokyo Institute of Technology: new initiatives

We are introducing a number of initiatives including active learning, a faculty mentor system where every faculty member mentors 5-10 students, increased numbers of lectures in English, invited top global researchers, provide facilities for foreign researchers, and broaden academic cooperation agreements and mutual accreditation of credits and degrees.

Professor Yoshinao Mishima, President of Tokyo Institute of Technology
Professor Yoshinao Mishima, President of Tokyo Institute of Technology

<img src=”http://www.eurotechnology.com/b/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/20140220_IMG_4885.jpg” alt=”Professor Yoshinao Mishima, President of Tokyo Institute of Technology” width=”590″ height=”924″

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Galapagos effect Japan's electronics multinationals University

Steve Jobs and SONY: why do Steven Jobs and SONY reach opposite answers to the same question: what to do with history?

Steve Jobs and SONY: why 180 degrees opposite decisions?

Steve Jobs donates history to Stanford University in order to focus on the future

Steve Jobs and SONY – when Steve Jobs when returned to Apple in 1996, and now SONY are faced with the same question: what to do about corporate archives and the corporate history museum? Interestingly Steve Jobs, and SONY reach exactly 180 degrees opposite answers to the same question:

  • Steve Jobs donates Apple corporate archives and company museum to Stanford University
  • SONY sells headquarters building, and keeps SONY corporate archives and company museum

Why opposite answers to the same question? Could it be good advice for SONY, to learn from Steve Jobs, and donate SONY-Museum and SONY-Archives to a University, and focus much more on the future?

Apple donates history collection to Stanford University:

Steve Jobs returned to Apple with the Apple purchase of NeXT on December 10, 1996. One of the first things Steve Jobs did was to orient the Apple into the future by donating the Apple Computer Inc. Museum and historical collections to Stanford University, as documented in Stanford University’s news release dated November 18, 1997. Apple’s archives are now at Stanford University’s Silicon Valley Archives.

Steve Jobs gave away Apple’s history documents in order to focus on the future.

SONY sells headquarters buildings but keeps SONY Archives and SONY Corporate History Museum:

SONY’s actions are almost exactly 180 degrees opposite to Apple’s and Steve Jobs’: according to Wallstreet Journal, The Japan News by Yomiuri, and other news sources, SONY sells the former headquarters buildings, but reports say that SONY will keep the SONY Archives and the SONY Corporate History Museum (ソニー歴史資料館).

To understand SONY’s financial situation over the last 15 years, read our Report on Japan’s electronics industry.

Why does Steve Jobs reach the 180 degrees opposite conclusion to SONY management when faced with the same question?

  • Is this a manifestation of Japan’s “Galapagos syndrome”?
  • Could this mean that SONY isn’t as forward looking as Steve Jobs when he returned to Apple in 1996?
  • Could it be good advice for SONY, to donate SONY-Museum and SONY-Archives to a University, and instead focus on the future?

Japan’s electronics industry sector – research report, including SONY

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Categories
University Urban

Modo Gakuen Cocoon Tower in Tokyo Shinjuku

Modo Gakuen Cocoon Tower in Tokyo Shinjuku

Purpose: shared by three Universities and schools, and others

4 underground floors + 50 above ground floors
building started: May 1, 2006
opened: October 15, 2008
Architects: Tange Associates
Building company: Shimizu

Modo Gakuen Cocoon Tower in Tokyo Shinjuku
Modo Gakuen Cocoon Tower in Tokyo Shinjuku

Modo Gakuen Cocoon Tower in Tokyo Shinjuku
Modo Gakuen Cocoon Tower in Tokyo Shinjuku

Modo Gakuen Cocoon Tower in Tokyo Shinjuku
Modo Gakuen Cocoon Tower in Tokyo Shinjuku

Modo Gakuen Cocoon Tower in Tokyo Shinjuku
Modo Gakuen Cocoon Tower in Tokyo Shinjuku

Modo Gakuen Cocoon Tower in Tokyo Shinjuku
Modo Gakuen Cocoon Tower in Tokyo Shinjuku

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Categories
Economics Japan's electronics industry University

Creating a Mission Statement for a Top Ranking Japanese Engineering University and Suggestions for its Realization

“Creating a Mission Statement for a Top Ranking Japanese Engineering University and Suggestions for its Realization”

Presentation by Gerhard Fasol at the “International Symposium on Building Global Excellence in Engineering Education”

“International Symposium on Building Global Excellence in Engineering Education”
Japanese program

Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan, Wednesday, September 3rd, 2003: 11:50-12:35

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University

Bio-Nanotechnology in Japan – Impact on Foreign Corporations

Presentation at the EU-Japan Center Tokyo and at Stanford University on April 11, 2002 in the SPRING 2002 Seminar/Public Lecture Series – Topics in International Advanced Technology of the US-Asia Technology Management Center.

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