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conference nanotechnology

International Nanotechnology Symposium in Tokyo 16 September 2019

21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo

日本語版

Cambridge University nanotechnology researchers and PhD students
Cambridge University nanotechnology researchers and PhD students

日本語版

International Nanotechnology Symposium in Tokyo

21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese corporations

Symposium chair and contact: Gerhard Fasol contact here

Monday 16 September 2019 15:00-21:00 in Tokyo

Purpose of the International Nanotechnology Symposium in Tokyo

Exchange of views on results and future development of different nanotechnology fields between 21 Cambridge University nano-technology researchers and PhD students, researchers and nanotechnology companies. Explore common interests, and potential cooperation.

University of Cambridge, founded 1209 AD

  • 107 Nobel Prize winners
  • around University of Cambridge: 4700 knowledge intensive companies, 560 high-tech manufacturing firms, 3000 IT and communication based companies
  • 2019 THE Times Higher Education Global University Ranking: Place 2 globally
  • 2019 ARWU Global University Ranking: Place 3 globally
  • 2019 QS Global University Ranking: Place 6 globally

Program

15:00 – 19:00

  • presentations by Cambridge nanotechnology researchers:
    • Session 1:  Nanotechnology for Energy & Sustainability
      • TU – Plastic waste as a feedstock for solar-driven hydrogen generation 
      • TL – Fibre-based optofluidics for sustainable photocatalysis
      • AG – Ultrafast charging Li-ion batteries
      • JM – Battery material degradation at the nanoscale studied by analytical electron microscopy
      • MJ – Understanding the nature of oxygen redox in Li-excess cation disordered rocksalts as cathode materials for Li-ion batteries
      • JT – Structure and ionic conductivity of metal-organic framework composites
      • TP – Light-induced patterning of structural colour
      • TB – Triboelectric textile for wearable energy harvesting
    •  Session 2: Nanomaterials & Nano-biotechnologies
      • RM – In-operando SEM to Develop Manufacturing of Nanomaterials
      • KS – Hierarchical carbon nanotube structures
      • BS – DNA origami for enzyme biomimicry
      • RRS – Force-sensing artificial cells and tissues with synthetic DNA mechanotransducers
      • RG – The role of viscoelasticity in axon guidance during development
      • TN – Implantable electrophoretic devices for spatially controlled administration of nanoscopic drug carriers for brain cancer therapy
    • Session 3: Nanoelectronics & Photonics
      • BD – Photophysics of thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitters
      • TG – Quantifying disorder in hybrid perovskites for optoelectronics
      • JO – Gold nanorod – MOF core-shell composites as advanced surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy sensors
      • EW – Transition edge sensors for far-infrared space science
      • SM – 3D structured carbon nanotube infrared detectors
      • LS – 3D magnetic nanostructures for spintronics
      • TL – Manipulating single electron spins in silicon CMOS spin qubits               
  • NTT Basic Research Laboratories
    • Hideki Gotoh: Overview of NTT R&D and Basic Research Laboratories
    • Hiroshi Yamaguchi: Semiconductor Electromechanical Devices
    • Akira Fujiwara: Silicon nanodevices for metrology and sensor applications
  • Nippon Electric Glass Co. Ltd.
    • Shingo Nakane, Division Manager, Fundamental Technology Division: Glass products for future applications
  • panel discussion on developments in nanotechnology fields and possibilities of future cooperation

19:00 – 21:00 discussions and buffet

please contact us via the form for enquiries

Organizer and responsible: Gerhard Fasol

fasol.com

  • Eurotechnology Japan KK CEO and Founder
  • Kyushu University Guest Professor

previously:

  • GMO Cloud KK (TSE:3788) Board Director and Member of the Supervisory & Audit Committee
  • University of Tokyo, Dept of Electrical Engineering Associate Professor and Sakigake Research Project
  • Hitachi Cambridge Laboratory, Laboratory Manager
  • Cambridge University, Cavendish Laboratory, Tenured University Lecturer
  • Trinity College Cambridge Teaching Fellow and Director of Studies
  • Cambridge University, Cavendish Laboratory PhD in Physics

Related organizations

Ludwig Boltzmann Forum

Energy – Entropy – Leadership

https://boltzmann.com/forum/

Trinity in Japan

Trinity in Japan: Trinity College, University of Cambridge officially recognized group.

Trinity in Japan: founder and chair Gerhard Fasol

Trinity College founded in 1546. Global impact. 33 Nobel Prize winners.

https://trinityjapan.org/

International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers in Tokyo meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019
International Nanotechnology Symposium: 21 University of Cambridge nanotechnology researchers meeting Japanese companies, 16 September 2019

Contact, registration and enquiries

please contact us via the form below to enquire about registration and fees

(c) 2019 Eurotechnology Japan KK. All Rights Reserved

Categories
electronics component makers LED Ludwig Boltzmann Symposia nanotechnology R&D science technology telecommunications

VCSEL – Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers by their inventor, Kenichi Iga (6th Ludwig Boltzmann Symposium)

VCSEL inventor Kenichi Iga: hv vs kT – Optoelectronics and Energy

(Former President and Emeritus Professor of Tokyo Institute of Technology. Inventor of VCSEL (vertical cavity surface emitting lasers), widely used in photonics systems)

Keynote presented at the 6th Ludwig Boltzmann Symposium on February 20, 2014 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo.

VCSEL: how Kenichi Iga invented Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers

My invention of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) dates back to March 22, 1977. Today VCSEL devices are used in many applications all over the world. I was awarded the 2013 Franklin Institute Award, the Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science, “for the conception and development of the vertical cavity surface emitting laser and its multiple applications in optoelectronics“. Benjamin Franklin’s work is linked to mine: Benjamin Franklin in 1752 discovered that thunder originates from electricity – he linked electronics (electricity) with photons (light). After 1960 the era of lasers began, we learnt how to combine and control electrons and photons, and the era of optoelectronics.

If you read Japanese, you may be interested to read an interview with Genichi Hatakoshi and myself, intitled “The treasure micro box of optoelectronics” which was recently published in the Japanese journal OplusE Magazine by Adcom-Media.

Electrons and photons

Who are electrons? Electrons are just like a cloud expressed by Schroedinger’s equation, which Schroedinger postulated in 1926. Electrons can also be seen as randomly moving particles, described by the particle version of Schroedinger’s equation (1931).

Where does light come from? Light is generated by the accelerated motion of charged particles.

Electrons also show interference patterns. For example, if we combine the 1s and 2p orbitals around a nucleus, we observe interference.

In a semiconductor, electrons are characterized by a band structure, filled valence bands and largely empty conduction bands. The population of hole states in the valence bands and of electrons in the conduction bands are determined by the Fermi-Dirac distribution. In typical III-V semiconductors, generation and absorption of light is by transitions between 4s anti-bonding orbitals (the bottom of the conduction band) and 4p bonding orbitals (the top of the valence band).

In Japan, we are good at inventing new types of vertical structures:

  • in 607, the Horyuji 5-Jyu-no Toh (5 story tower) was built in Nara, and today we have progressed to building the 634 meter high Tokyo Sky Tree Tower.
  • in 1893, Kubota Co. Ltd. developed the vertical molding of water pipes
  • in 1977 Shunichi Iwawaki invented vertical magnetic memory
  • in 1977 Tatsuo Izawa developed VAD (vapor-phase axial deposition) of silica fibers
  • in 1977 Kenichi Iga invented vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL)

Communications and optical signal transmission

History of communications spans from 10,000 years BC with the invention of language, and 3000 BC with the invention of written characters and papyrus, to the invention of the internet in 1957, the realization of the laser in 1960, the realization of optical fiber communications in 1984, and now since 2008 we see Web 2.x and Cloud.

Optical telegraphy goes back to 200 BC, when optical beacons were used in China: digital signals using multi-color smoke. Around 600 AD we had optical beacons in China, Korea and Japan, and in 1200 BC also in Mongolia and India.
In the 18th and 19th century, optical semaphores were used in France.

In the 20th century, optical beam transmission using optical rods and optical fiber transmissions were developed, which combined with the development of lasers created today’s laser communications. Yasuharu Suematsu and his student showed the world’s first demonstration of optical fiber communications demonstration on May 26, 1963 at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, using a He-Ne laser, an electro-optic crystal for modulation of the laser light by the electrical signal from a microphone, and optical bundle fiber, and a photo-tube at the other end of the optical fiber bundle to revert the optical signals back into electrical signals and finally to drive a loud speaker. For his pioneering work, Yasuharu Suematsu was awarded the International Japan Prize in 2014.

VCSEL: I recorded my initial idea for the surface emitting laser on March 22, 1977 in my lab book.

Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSEL) have many advantages:

  1. ultra-low power consumption: small volume
  2. pure spectrum operation: short cavity
  3. continuous spectrum tuning: single resonance
  4. high speed modulation: wide response range
  5. easy coupling to optical fibers: circular mode
  6. monolithic fabrication like LSI
  7. wafer level probe testing
  8. 2-dimensional array
  9. vertical stack integration with micro-machine
  10. physically small

VCSEL have found applications in many fields, including: data communications, sensing, printing, interconnects, displays.

As an example, the Tsubame-2 supercomputer, which in November 2011 was 5th of top-500 supercomputers, and on June 2, 2011 was greenest computer of Green500, uses 3500 optical fiber interconnects with a length of 100km. In 2012: Too500/Green500/Graph500

IBM Sequoia uses 330,000 VCSELs.

Fuji Xerox introduced the first demonstration of 2 dimensional 4×8 VCSEL printer array for high speed and ultra-fine resolution laser printing: 14 pages/minute and 2400 dots/inch.

VCSEL: Some recent news:

The laser market is estimated to be US$ 11 billion by 2017.
VCSELs move to optical interconnects.
By 2019 the optical interconnect market is estimated to reach US$ 5.2 billion.

VCSEL: In summary

VCSEL photonics started from minor reputation and generated big innovation. VCSELs feature:

  • low power consumption: good for green ICE
  • high speed modulation beyond 20 GBits/second
  • 2D array
  • good productivity due to monolithic process

Future: will generate ideas never thought before.

VCSEL em. President of Tokyo Institute of Technology, Professor Kenichi Iga, inventor of VCSEL
em. President of Tokyo Institute of Technology, Professor Kenichi Iga, inventor of VCSEL
VCSEL Gerhard Fasol (left), em. President of Tokyo Institute of Technology, Professor Kenichi Iga (right)
Gerhard Fasol (left), em. President of Tokyo Institute of Technology, Professor Kenichi Iga (right)

Copyright (c) 2014 Eurotechnology Japan KK All Rights Reserved

Categories
nanotechnology R&D science technology

Magnetic and metallic nanowires

Gerhard Fasol was one of the invited speakers of the “Device Applications of Nanoscale Materials Symposium” at the 1998 National ACS Meeting in Dallas, Texas, which was organized by John St. John of Texas Christian University.

Gerhard Fasol’s talk: “Selective Electrodeposition of Magnetic and Metallic Nanowires: A New Approach to a Fundamental Technology”

Symposium purpose:
The two main purposes of this symposium are (1) to demonstrate current, innovative applications of chemistry in the nanometer size regime for use in optoelectronics and (2) to identify potential areas for partnerships between industry and academia where research in nanoscale chemistry can be applied to emerging technologies. It is hoped that this symposium will benefit chemists working in nanotechnology by providing a forum for discussing applications with leading industries.

Press Conference participants:

  • James R. Von Ehr II, Zyvex LLC;
  • Howard E. Katz, Bell Laboratories-Lucent Technologies;
  • Jie Han, NASA Ames Research Laboratory;
  • Gerhard Fasol, Eurotechnology Japan K. K.;

Technical program

  • 8:00 am: Marye Anne Fox , University of Texas, Austin; Imaging With Chromophore-Modified Self Assembled Monolayers
  • 8:40 am: Howard E. Katz, Bell Laboratories-Lucent Technologies; Chemical Structure, film Morphology, and Deposition Process Optimization of Organic Transistor Semiconductors
  • 9:20 am: James R. Von Ehr II, Zyvex LLC; Building a Molecular Nanotechnology Industry
  • 10:00 am: William Hinsburg, IBM Research Division; Resist Requirements for Sub-100 nm Microlithography
  • 10:30 am: Gerhard Fasol, Eurotechnology Japan K. K.; Selective Electrodeposition of Magnetic and Metallic Nanowires: A New Approach to a Fundamental Technology
  • 11:10 am: Alan J. Heeger, IPOS, UCSB, and UNIAX Corp.,.; Polymer Light Emitting Electrochemical Cells: A Device Application of Nanscale Chemistry
  • 11:50 am: Jie Han, NASA Ames Research Laboratory; Exploring Carbon Nanotubes for Nanoscale Devices
  • 2:00 pm: Richard BrotzmanNanophase Technologies Corporation; Nanoscale Materials for Optoelectronics
  • 2:30 pm: Louis Brus, Columbia University; Spectroscopy and “Blinking” of Single Semiconductor Nanocrystals at Room Temperature
  • 3:10 pm: Jeffery L. Coffer, Texas Christian University; Nanophase Silicon as an Optoelectronic / Biocompatible Material
  • 4:00 pm: James M. Tour, University of South Carolina; Molecular Scale Electronics
  • 4:40 pm: Tapesh Yadav, Nanomaterials Research Corporation; Device Applications of Nanoscale Materials

For Gerhard Fasol’s related publications see:

  • Gerhard Fasol: “Nanowires: Small is Beautiful” SCIENCE, 280, p. 545-546 (24 April 1998)
  • Gerhard Fasol and Katharina Runge: “Selective Electrodeposition of nanometer scale magnetic wires” Applied Physics Letters, 70, p. 2467-2468 (5 May 1997)
  • G. Fasol, “Spontaneous Spin Polarization in Quantum Wires”, Proc. 22nd International Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors (ICPS), edited by D. J. Lockwood, (World Scientific, Singapore, 1995), p. 1739-1742.
  • G. Fasol and H. Sakaki, “Spontaneous Spin Polarization due to Electron- Electron Interaction in Quantum Wires”, in “Nanostructures and Quantum Effects”, edited by H. Sakaki and H. Noge, [Proceedings of the JRDC Int. Symposium on Nanostructures and Quantum Effects, 17—18 Nov. 1993, Tsukuba (Japan)], Springer-Verlag, Berlin, p. 121-130 (1994).
  • G. Fasol and H. Sakaki, “Spontaneous Spin Polarization in Quantum Wires”, Philosophical Magazine, 70, 601-616 (1994).
  • G. Fasol and H. Sakaki, “Prediction of Spin-Polarization Effects in Quantum Wire Transport”, Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, 33, 879-886 (1994).
  • G. Fasol, Y. Nagamune, J. Motohisa und H. Sakaki, “Determination of Quantum Wire Potential and Hot Electron Spectroscopy Using Point Contacts”, Surface Science, 305, 620-623 (1994).
  • G. Fasol, “Calculation of Electron Coherence Lengths for Quantum Wires”, in: 21st International Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors, ed. by Ping Jiang and Hou-Zhi Zheng, World Scientific, (Singapore, 1992), p. 1411.
  • G. Fasol and H. Sakaki, “Electron-electron Scattering in Quantum Wires and its Possible Suppression due to Spin Effects”, Physical Review Letters, 70, 3643-3646 (1993).
  • G. Fasol and H. Sakaki, “Spontaneous Spin-Polarization of Ballistic Electrons in Single Mode Quantum Wires Due to Spin Splitting”, Applied Physics Letters, 62, 2230-2232 (1993).
  • G. Fasol and H. Sakaki, “Electron-Electron Scattering in Quantum Wells and Wires”, Proceedings of the 19th Int. Symposium on Gallium Arsenide and Related Compounds, (Karuizawa 1992), Institute of Physics Conference Series No. 129, p. 311 (1992).
  • G. Fasol, “Absence of Low Temperature Saturation of Electron–Electron Scattering in a Single Mode Quantum Wire”, Applied Physics Letters, 61, 831-833 (1992)
  • G. Fasol, “Electron Dephasing Due to Coulomb Interaction”, Applied Physics Letters 59, 2430-2432 (1991)

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